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Designing for Digital is a two-day conference packed with intensive, hands-on workshops and informative sessions meant to help educate and expose library and information professionals to colleagues working on user experience, discovery, design and usability projects inside and outside of libraries, drawing expertise from the tech and education communities, as well as from peers.

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Thursday, February 26
 

9:00am

Keynote by Jon Kolko: How to Use Empathy to Create Products People Love
Most companies consider strong product management to be the “glue” that holds together products as they are being conceived of and built, and most companies treat product management as either a marketing or an engineering activity. But modern startups like Airbnb and large corporations like JetBlue or Starbucks have proven that industry disruption is possible not by focusing on adding features or just improving sales, but instead by focusing on providing deep, meaningful engagement to the people that use their products or services. This engagement is achieved by designing products that seem as though they have a personality, or even a soul. These products feel less like manufactured artifacts and more like good friends.
Design doesn’t refer only to aesthetics or usability, although these are things consumers are most likely to notice or appreciate. Design is both a noun and a verb. It can mean the visual or tactical quality of a product, as well as the process by which products are conceived. Design is a more comprehensive way of thinking about people and human behavior than engineering or marketing. It is a product development process that uses empathy with a community of potential consumers in order to identify problems to solve. Design leverages a certain way of thinking in order to infer solutions to those problems that will have meaningful emotional appeal, and a strong market fit.
In this talk, you’ll learn how to apply that process yourself using these four steps:
- Identify product/market fit, by seeking signals from communities of users
- Identify behavioral insights, by conducting ethnographic research
- Sketch a product strategy, by synthesizing complex research data into simple insights
- Define the product details, using visual representations to simplify complex ideas

This is part of the Designing for Digital Conference.  Learn more at www.designingfordigital.com.


Speakers
avatar for Jon Kolko

Jon Kolko

Vice President of Consumer Design, Blackboard
Jon Kolko is Vice President of Consumer Design at Blackboard; he joined Blackboard with the acquisition of MyEdu, a startup focused on helping students succeed in college and get jobs. Jon is also the Founder and Director of Austin Center for Design. His work focuses on bringing the... Read More →


Thursday February 26, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Room 101

10:15am

Informing an Effective Response to User Needs: What We Did and What We Learned

The last decade has been one of rapid change for libraries as we attempt to keep up with the ever-changing needs and demands of users.  Making it even more daunting are the diverse service needs and expectations of students and faculty in various disciplines. In this climate of constant change, understanding user experience with new services and technologies is critical.  According to ISO 9241-210,2010 standards, user experience is defined as “a person's perceptions and responses that result from the use or anticipated use of a product, system or service.”  Within the context of libraries, user experience focuses on the user’s feelings while using library collections, discovery tools, or services, and it is influenced by the expectations and experiences of the user.  Successful system and service design that meets user expectations depend on an organizational commitment to user-focused design, data-driven decision making, and communication.  The 2010- 2013 Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) Strategic Plan explicitly called for the Libraries work to be guided by user- focused design and data-driven decision making: “In the years ahead, the work of CUL/IS will be guided by [the following principles]: user-focused design, data-driven decision making, continuous assessment of results, and flexible and adaptive response to user needs.” As has been the case with our counterparts across the nation, we have made great strides in each of these areas included in the strategic plan to better understand our users’ experiences and expectations. This talk presents a sample of the types of user experience projects that we have completed in the last two years. Highlights include five projects, each utilizing a different method, that led to changes in the platforms used to deliver digital services and collections as well as changes in how we staff these services:

- Usability testing of Libraries discovery tool and website

- Exploiting Google Analytics data to improve Libraries discovery tool and website

- Interviews and focus groups to understand eBook usage and perceptions

- Observation studies to advance our understanding of user interactions with library environment and technology

 

This is part of the Designing for Digital Conference.  Learn more at www.designingfordigital.com.


Speakers
avatar for Nisa Bakkalbasi

Nisa Bakkalbasi

Assessment Coordinator, Columbia University
Nisa Bakkalbasi is the Assessment Coordinator at Columbia University Libraries. Prior to joining Columbia University, Nisa was the Director of Planning and Assessment at James Madison University, and held a series of positions at Yale University Libraries. She has also taught courses... Read More →


Thursday February 26, 2015 10:15am - 11:00am
Room 102

10:15am

The Great Website Redesign Balancing Act: Walking the Tightrope from Idea to Launch

Like any large structure, the process of building a library website starts long before the first line of code is written: budgets, RFPs, timelines, identifying (and balancing) the needs and preferences of diverse stakeholders, representing complex services and structures -- and all in a design that pleases everyone and complies with brand standards. How do we ensure that overarching concerns like user experience, content strategy and governance, and accessibility don’t simply fall by the wayside as the project progresses? In this session, Courtney Greene McDonald, Head of Discovery & Research Services at Indiana University Libraries, and Rick Cecil, Director of User Experience at Bluespark Labs share five common challenges experienced in library website redesign projects, with tips and insights drawn from their contrasting perspectives from inside and outside the library. Attendees will come away with processes, techniques and methodologies to tackle these common challenges, even before the first wireframe is sketched.

 

This is part of the Designing for Digital Conference.  Learn more at www.designingfordigital.com.


Speakers
avatar for Rick Cecil

Rick Cecil

Director of User Experience, Bluespark Labs
avatar for Courtney Greene McDonald

Courtney Greene McDonald

Head of Discovery & Research Services, Indiana University
Courtney Greene McDonald is Head of the Discovery & Research Services department at the Indiana University Bloomington Libraries. She has presented and written on a variety of topics, most recently on discovery tools and user experience on mobile services for libraries, including... Read More →


Thursday February 26, 2015 10:15am - 11:00am
Room 101

11:15am

Content Strategy for Library Websites
Quality web content is absolutely essential to the user experience, yet it is all too often neglected on library websites. Let’s give content the attention it deserves. In this practical session, learn how to implement a strategy to care for the entire lifecycle of your web content.

This is part of the Designing for Digital Conference.  Learn more at www.designingfordigital.com.


Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Blakiston

Rebecca Blakiston

User Experience Librarian, University of Arizona Libraries


Thursday February 26, 2015 11:15am - 12:00pm
Room 101

11:15am

Fast Talks: UX Projects & Research

Fast Talks: UX Projects & Research

This 45-minute session allows for 10 minute Fast Talks on four projects.  Find these presenters later in the day to dive into details or ask questions. 

1. A Library Catalog UX Study in Preparation for a Website Redesign
Mary Marissen, Collections Specialist, Swarthmore College Library

The consortium of Swarthmore, Bryn Mawr and Haverford College Libraries had plans already in place to engage a web design firm for a catalog redesign, when a Swarthmore alumnus, professional UX consultant and educator, volunteered his expertise to guide a UX study for the site. Under his guidance and with the help of a full-time student intern, we conducted formative user tests to learn how students understand the catalog and navigate searches. We shared our study and resulting recommendations with the design firm, who in conjunction with their own processes, will be ready to unveil the new site design in February 2015.

2. Designing for Better Database Discovery: Simplifying a Complicated Problem
Alex Sundt, Web Services Librarian, Utah State University

Despite the power of web-scale discovery, to effectively search large and diverse e-resource collections, library users still need to utilize the native search features of many databases. But often just choosing a good resource can be a difficult task, forcing users to invest significant time and energy trying out different options to find the database that’s “just right” for their information needs. Without strong cues, meaningful descriptions, or appropriate tools to help identify good resources, users resort to trial and error, or turn to databases that have worked well in the past, only to be frustrated when these strategies don’t meet their current needs. To alleviate this guesswork, a team of librarians and programmers at the Merrill-Cazier Library decided to investigate ways to support better decision-making and reduce the interaction costs for users wanting to browse our e-resource collection. Informed by an earlier usability study, our new design simplifies the user experience, while improving database presentation and adding navigation options that can help users make more informed and successful resource selections. This session will demonstrate our design prototype, describe initial findings from user testing, and propose additional steps and potential enhancements to increase the usefulness of this design.

3. UX @ NYU Libraries: How One Library Department is Incorporating UX Methods for a Better Web Presence
Juliana Culbert, Emerging Technologies Librarian at Rochester Institute of Technology, formerly part of UX Dept. at NYU Libraries

The plethora of user centered methods can make it hard to determine what approaches fit best when trying to improve library interfaces for users. In this session, you’ll hear about some effective UX methods the User Experience Department at NYU Libraries employs to create a better, more user-friendly web presence. As a small, versatile department, we work with stakeholders from around the university to incorporate user centered methods into agile product design and development.

4. Rinse & Repeat Usability Testing
Marie Maxey, Product Analyst, UX, SAGE Publications

At SAGE we’re experimenting with the ability to use a ‘rinse and repeat’ styled approach to our user testing practice. Our goal is to get better at what we do every time we do it, while keeping our methods flexible and responsive to our products requirements. We’re weighing the costs and benefits of different approaches – when are we best served by classic talk-out-loud usability methods? And when do we need a hybrid test that includes semi-structured interviews at the end? How can we best determine tester proficiency, to help inform our analysis of test results? We’d like to achieve a system that encourages our test participants to ‘come again’ and have a long term relationship with us, with the goal of continuing to recruit new participants to build a community around our products.

 

This is part of the Designing for Digital Conference.  Learn more at www.designingfordigital.com.


Thursday February 26, 2015 11:15am - 12:00pm
Room 102

1:15pm

How do students *really* do research? Revelations from the "Research Confession Booth"
We developed a simple, low-frills protocol for a pop-up user study called the Research Confession Booth. Participants were recruited from amongst passersby to complete a ten-minute task at a laptop, while Quicktime captured their screen, mouseclicks, and voice narration. Tasks have included "Show us a favorite feature of a resource you use to do research" and "Walk us through a snag you recently encountered while trying to find information for your coursework." With very little overhead, we've been able to capture a rich trove of information about how our users understand and navigate our systems, and how they actually do their research. We'd like to share the basics of our protocol (including tips on making it IRB-friendly) as well as some highlights from the data we've collected thus far.

This is part of the Designing for Digital Conference.  Learn more at www.designingfordigital.com.


Speakers
avatar for Odile Harter

Odile Harter

Harvard University
avatar for Emily Singley

Emily Singley

Systems Librarian, Harvard University


Thursday February 26, 2015 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Room 102

1:15pm

Tactics and tips for developing and deploying scenario driven interfaces

Designing and developing interfaces devoid of understanding the needs and behaviors of your users can lead to fragmented user interactions and interfaces. In this session I’ll discuss some UX strategies and methods-including customer journeys, scenarios, and personas-we've incorporated into product development that ensure the user is central to the process.


This is part of the Designing for Digital Conference.  Learn more at www.designingfordigital.com.

Speakers
avatar for Nadaleen Tempelman-Kluit

Nadaleen Tempelman-Kluit

Head, User Experience Department, NYU Libraries


Thursday February 26, 2015 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Room 101

2:00pm

Starting a UX Team and Getting Buy-in at Your Library

In Spring 2014, a user experience that was confusing to both library patrons and staff made me begin on the journey to create a UX Team at my university library.  I am eager to share what I learned in the form of practical tips and recommendations on that process: from writing the proposal, to getting buy-in, and selecting projects. In addition, I'll share details of an exciting and productive collaboration with a Qualitative Methods class that provided the newly formed UX Team with a rich source of data and a great place to begin. 

This is part of the Designing for Digital Conference.  Learn more at www.designingfordigital.com.


Speakers
avatar for Joscelyn Leventhal

Joscelyn Leventhal

Online Education and Off-Campus Services Librarian, George Washington University


Thursday February 26, 2015 2:00pm - 2:45pm
Room 102

3:45pm

Closing Keynote by Frank Migliorelli: Taming the Digital Lion

Last year, the New York Public Library established a new department- Department of Digital Experience. With a wide reaching range of services- from cultural programs, education programs, exhibitions, and traditional library services, the NYPL has begun to shape a digital strategy that will serve literacy students, educators, researchers, tourists, families and more. The new department supports existing programs and services, and will explore new opportunities for applications of digital technologies to improve and enhance customer service, program operations, user experience and access to information.

Frank Migliorelli, an experience designer who took the reigns as Director of Digital Experience last July, will talk about the challenges he’s uncovered as this new initiative helps to transform one of the world’s largest library systems. From redeveloping a new website, the approach to digitizing and activating a vast group of collections and archives, and bringing interactive, digital experiences to a traditional artifact-based exhibit program, he’ll share his ideas of creating user experiences that will not only transform NYPL’s on-line world, but also impact and enhance the digital/physical connection between our customers, the famous lion flagship building, the branches, and the NYPL community all over the world.

 

This is part of the Designing for Digital Conference.  Learn more at www.designingfordigital.com.


Speakers
avatar for Frank Migliorelli

Frank Migliorelli

Director of Digital Experience, New York Public Library
Frank Migliorelli is the New York Public Library’s Director of Digital Experience, a new position created to lead the development of the institution’s overall digital strategy for user experience, exhibits and educational programs. He is an award-winning interaction designer... Read More →


Thursday February 26, 2015 3:45pm - 4:30pm
Room 101